Chronic Pain Talk With Cathy Ruprecht

NewGait CEO, Benga Adeeko, had the opportunity to ask Cathy Ruprecht, PT, NewGait Clinician, and pain specialist, a number of questions regarding the treatment of chronic pain, and how The NewGait has changed the way she practices. Also features Kim Spranger, PT and NewGait Clinician

Chronic Pain Talk - Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Cathy Ruprecht, NewGait Clinician and Physical Therapist, gives us an in depth discussion regarding chronic pain. Moderated by Benga Adeeko, NewGait CEO. Also features Kim Spranger, PT & NewGait Clinician.

CATHY: My colleague at the time, Kim Spranger, had just come across this product, and was using it with a client. One day brought it out, dumped it onto the table and said, “Look at this neat thing that I have here. Let’s try it and see what we can do with this, because I think this has great potential to help people.” So I looked at it and I said, “Ok…I’m game.” So we started to use it with clients in the clinic and four years later now, it’s been quite an evolution and revolution in our practices.

CATHY: Well, chronic pain is how we classify pain that is long term and persistent. Usually when someone has an accident or an injury or surgery, there is some sort of a tissue damage. It is usually repaired in about three months. Most people heal right up and go on about their business, and they don’t have much pain at all remaining. But in some individuals, pain is persistent and can linger for years after someone has had an accident or injury. We’ve also learned that pain can come on without an accident or an injury of some significant level of tissue damage, and so these individuals find this pain to be life-changing and very disturbing for them, so my job is to try to teach them about pain and get them moving again, and that’s been the journey that I take them on. We have now in recent times begun to look at pain a bit differently. We always equated tissue damage with pain, but we’ve now learned that some individuals have no tissue damage and significant levels of pain, some people have significant tissue damage and no pain, and so pain is very complex and we now define it, instead of a biomechanical model, we now look at it as a bio-psychosocial model where there are many aspects of our emotion and our memory and our brain thought processes that contribute to someone’s pain experience.

KIM: I would like to add to that, you know, Cathy’s journey with chronic pain has been very interesting. In the 1990s we were asked to get involved with developing a chronic pain program for our region. Cathy took it to a totally different level and actually in the last couple of years, she has developed a long-term philosophy on how to treat chronic pain that all of us have now adopted and are using in our clinics. I think of a patient this fall who came back and she said, “This has changed my life. I want you to know how much you’ve changed my life by the way that you’ve approached my pain.” So I want to give a whole lot of credibility to what Cathy is saying and she has changed the way we are treating chronic pain across the upper peninsula of Michigan.

“She has changed they way we are treating chronic pain across the upper peninsula of Michigan.”

CATHY: Many individuals have been to multiple doctors over time and have had multiple procedures done, for which their pain seems to be unrelenting and ongoing, and at that point, sometimes the physicians will say, “Well, this looks like a chronic condition for you. We don’t see anything that’s life-threatening. We don’t see anything that needs surgery or operations, you’re medically stable, so at this point we are going to diagnose you as having chronic or persistent pain and perhaps a different approach for therapy may be helpful for you.” That’s oftentimes how people find their way to me.

CATHY: What I practice is pain is not just a tissue damage issue, so people come in, they bring their minds, they bring their thoughts, they bring their ideals, they bring their beliefs, they bring this history of their pain and so with the practice that I use, it’s a bio-psychosocial model of pain, so we look at pain in multiple levels as far as what’s your stress level like, are you getting good sleep, what other aspects of your health might be contributing to your long-term pain and how might we utilize those aspects to help you change and regain control of your pain, so oftentimes I’m not there to try to change pain…I will explain it…I don’t have the magic exercise, I don’t have the magic power in my hands to take your pain away right now, but we’re going to recognize and build on that you’re medically stable and that what you have you can do things with and over the course of time as you increase your activities and as you start to lose some of your focus on the pain, you’ll find that it does become less intense and less frequent and less debilitating as we move forward in this different way to look at pain, and so I spend a lot of time working with people on body awareness. Many people when they have chronic and persistent pain, they really don’t have a great mind/body connection. They’re not very aware of where they are in space. They really view sometimes their own body as the enemy. They don’t want to think about it. All it is, is a source of pain and so I try to reconnect them to their whole self and that’s the fun of what I get to do, so we work on all sorts of aspects; use of mirrors to see where we are in space, focusing on movement patterns that are comfortable, body parts that don’t hurt, and so I have a whole toolbox of things that we go through and teach, but we also really try to work on understanding lifestyle’s contribution to pain, anxiety’s contribution to pain, fear and worry and anxiety’s contributions to pain, and so we want to try and break this cycle of how someone might be living by giving them something new and different to do that then will allow them to move forward with less frequent, less intense pain.

“They view sometimes their own body as the enemy. They don’t want to think about it. All it is, is a source of pain so I try to reconnect them to their whole self.”

CATHY: You know, each therapist develops their own beliefs and their own toolbox in working with folks with chronic and persistent pain, for instance, someone comes to me with back pain. Typically, a therapist might do some manual therapy on them, massage, electrical stimulation, certain exercises to build the core, that kind of thing. But my philosophy is to spend a lot of time on education, on really understanding the nervous system, how they function to keep us safe and then how that nervous system can be manipulated through some tools like your breathing can change the way your body is perceiving itself and to create changes within our nervous system’s connections to the brain, and so what I do is a lot of education, a lot of mindfulness, a lot of breathing and, again, body awareness, and so we try to build different tools into a box that a patient might not have seen before because many times when a patient comes to me, they’ll say, “Well, I’ve been to therapy before,” you know, and “been there, done that. What are you going to do that’s different,” so in order to really do something different, I have to have something different, and so that’s one of the tools that I use is the NewGait because that also is something new and different in helping people with chronic and persistent pain.

CATHY: I wish I knew exactly. If anybody wants to do some research, call me… but I have some ideas and some theories on it and taking what I know and combining it with what I see, and so there are a couple of things that I really have some strong opinion and belief about — there’s a woman named Amy Cuddy…she’s a Ph.D., and if you’re not familiar with her, she’s written a book called Presence. She has this fabulous Ted Talk on YouTube about posture, and in her Ted Talk, she talks about our bodies and our minds, and she says that our bodies change our minds, our minds change our bodies, and our minds change our behaviors, and our behaviors can change our outcome, and to me that’s a really very powerful statement, and, in that, when we walk, walking is a really important component for treatment of chronic pain. When we walk and when we do cardiovascular exercise, it changes our blood flow, it changes all sorts of physiological responses within us, and for many people with chronic and persistent pain, it can really help to decrease their level of their pain, and so when you have people with chronic and persistent pain, the last thing they typically want to do is go for a walk and so the NewGait allows me to make some changes in how they walk, it allows me to change their postures, and so by changing our postures — Amy Cuddy again, relating back to her — has done a lot of research to show that when we change our posture into a more powerful, upright, balanced alignment, we really are changing our body’s physiology. We’re decreasing cortisol and stress levels. There’s a powerfulness that almost feels like it exudes from you when you change your postural alignment and positioning, and the NewGait, by putting it on, it gives my own self…plus what I hear from my clients…it gives us a sense of grounding, if you will, or a sense of scapular depression is what I often feel, and I feel myself draw taller, and when I do that…and from what Amy has stated in her research…we are making a change in our physiology, and any time we can decrease stress and cortisol levels, we’re also then able to change the nervous system to a more relaxed, comfortable positioning, and so therefore then many clients report that they feel less pain, and that has been a really interesting and rather unexpected benefit of the NewGait’s use with clients and patients is when they literally turn to me and say, “I walk now and I don’t have any pain,” and that was really not something I had anticipated or expected, but I tell you, when I heard it the first two or three times from patients, I said, “Wow. There must be something going on here,” and so that’s when I really started to embrace the NewGait as a device to help change peoples’ movement patterns. Many people when they come in with persistent and chronic pain, they have a really distinct posture. They are very withdrawn, pulled in, pulled down, and so if you change physiologically by straightening and being taller and standing and occupying more space, then that’s a huge benefit again in pain management, plus when I put people into the NewGait, I also believe there are some other factors happening. I recently read a book called Explain Pain by Lorimer Moseley and David Butler, and they had some ideas which I grabbed a hold of when I read through that also then relate to the NewGait for me. A couple of things that they had said was, you know, your body, your sensory system, your nervous system, is reporting constantly to your brain different things. It senses temperature, it senses mechanical pressures and stimulations, and it senses chemistry within you so, certainly, when we are in a state of stress, then we are going to have more bombardment of those stress hormones and that can, again, elevate someone’s pain, so when we are able too change physiologically their posture, that, to me, is soothing for the nervous system. The other thing about the NewGait is it creates a joint congruence and once again, relating back to explaining pain, when we have joint congruence and there is an approximation increase at the joint, specifically I feel it through the scapula and at he hip joint at the greater trochanteric joint, when I experience that sense, my body feels more calm from that congruence, and also when we’re in a stress state, we also tend to operate with our bigger, extrinsic musculature because we’re going to heighten state of arousal, ready for flight or fight, but when we’re able to become more relaxed and more confident within our bodies, the smaller intrinsic muscles like your multifidus and your postural control muscles and your ability to breathe deeper with your diaphragm, is also changed and the body finds that calming as well, so there is definitely, from the NewGait, a sense of deep pressure hug. You feel it around your thighs and calves from the limb strap, from the shoulder harness, from the waist strap, that’s changing sensory input to the brain and that then is what I believe is giving people a sense of decreased pain as they move through space. What’s been interesting is also how people move with chronic pain, their gait pattern. You see a real lateral, side-to-side gait pattern. Their movements are slow and guarded. They’re usually dragging along some sort of a limb, so oftentimes I see people who have had knee pain, hip pain, back pain. They might have piriformis syndrome where they’ve got a lot of gluteus maximus pain in that region. They also might have some sort of sensory impairment like they’ve lost dorsiflexion or they’ve lost their ability to push-off/toe-off, and they’ve got no power in those gastrocs to push off. Well, every time you bring your leg forward into swing phase, that creates this lurching motion, but with the NewGait, I can change that. I can change their step width to make them more balanced. I can change the ease with which they get hip flexion, I can give them a quicker break-over at the ankle for a faster push-off at that toe-off moment to start the swing phase, and so it’s been really interesting to see the changes in gait. Again, with an improved posture, I can initiate trunk rotation and arm swing, and so the result of use of the NewGait with my chronic pain patients has been really quite remarkable, not only for me, but for them.

“The NewGait allows me to make changes in how they walk, it allows me to change their posture, and by changing their posture, we change into a more powerful, upright, balanced alignment, we really are changing our body’s physiology.”

CATHY: I pretty much have it on everyone, at least…when people come to me, I really want to see how they move. I want to increase their walking confidence. I want to increase their walking speed. We know now that walking speed is indicative of someone’s longevity, and so I want to make changes in how they move because that is so essential to life. Walking and walking briskly to cover ground allows us to take our minds out to explore and it allows us to do the things we no longer have been doing because of our pain, and so I really focus a lot on gait and movement and walking as a treatment strategy, and so I videotape everyone. I get a walking test on them to see how fast they’re moving. I analyze that video. I look at their movement pattern and then we look at it together and they can see how they can move differently, and the cool thing is sometimes when we get the bands just right, and I don’t know exactly where that’s going to be. There are different configurations of the NewGait that I will apply, and what I’m looking for is that individual’s nervous system to tell us when we hit that eureka moment when they suddenly say to me, “Wow. I’m walking without pain,” or “Wow. My pain is down significantly from when I can in here,” and for some people, there is carry-over. They have less pain…it might be for an hour after they see me. Sometimes it’s three or four days after they see me, so there is a huge neurological change happening within them when they use this device, and so it…I don’t know exactly who that person’s going to be…for whom they break into tears and say, “Oh my gosh…I haven’t walked like this in years,” but if I don’t put it on someone, I won’t know who that person’s going to be and I may have missed an opportunity to really change their life and change their gait with this really unique tool that gives them a different feedback to give them a different output of their pain than they had experienced ever before.

CATHY: I let the clients guide me. They’ll come back and I’ll say, “How did you feel after you were here? What was your experience,” and many times they’ll say, “You know, I went to the grocery store and I walked or my family noticed I was walking differently, or my father said, ‘Oh my gosh. Look at your posture. Look how straight and tall you’re standing. Look at how fast you’re walking,’” and so I get their feedback, and if they feel like they are now doing better, they may not need it again. They have that change of perception in self that we were looking for…boom, we’re good to go, but sometimes they’ll say, “You know, I want to try that again. I can’t wait to get back in that because I felt so different, so much more powerful, so much more confident, like I could walk like I used to.” That’s what they’re looking for with me, so each person has their own response to it and I let them guide me.

CATHY: Well, what we work on then is body awareness, so we’ll go to the mirror and we’ll work on posture. We’ll work on balance in single limb stance. We’ll work on “Well, where are my shoulders, where is my levelness in my waist, how am I aligning myself,” and so we’ll look at all of these different changes that we’re trying to establish as they’re standing and trying to recreate a new sense of self. I’ll have them climb stairs. I’ll have them do step-ups. “Where is your weight, using your gluteus to give yourself a lift, think of the weight through the heel.” It’s a lot of, you know, “Where are you in space,” and so we work on proprioception again, both with the mirror, sometimes without the mirror. We’ll work with SportCord. I’ll have them do some upper body work with resistance bands while they’re stabilizing their posture, while they’re stabilizing the lower portion of their body while they’re wearing the NewGait. Sometimes we’ll go for a walk in the parking lot or, depending on the weather, we might go over some hill and dale, up and down some different levels of terrain, so we’re using it in the clinic to walk, we’re using it in the clinic to stand and reshape where we feel our body and, again, it’s that mind-body connection I think that’s helps people have a new perception of how they move, that they can move differently and by moving differently, they sometimes feel a whole lot better.

CATHY: Remember, many times, people have been to therapy elsewhere and so in order to try and provide something different, I will say, “Hey, I have this special suit that we can try and many people find it very helpful for teaching you about where you are in space and some people really love this to walk in and you might too find that it’s helpful for getting you to move like you used to, to move more comfortably and more confidently,” and so they’re so wonderful…they’re so wonderful to give it a try, and I tell them too, “You know, if you don’t want to or if this isn’t comfortable, you…you just have to tell me and we will be done, but let’s see how it feels because your body is going to give us a response just like it’s responding to the fact that it’s unhappy about something by giving you the perception of pain, right?” When we get it different, suddenly your body goes, “Hey, I’ve been waiting for a long time for you to change up the way you’ve been walking. Now I don’t have to report about that pain anymore,” and so we play with the…we’re really just manipulating the nervous system maybe and that’s what we do…we think of it as fun and it’s playful and I try to make it entertaining, and so they’re pretty game to give it a go, and the best ones are the ones that give you that skeptical eye…that they’re quite sure that you are just nuts and this isn’t going to make a change, but they’re the ones that are most rewarding, of course, because they’re the ones that go, “Wow. I didn’t expect that,” so that…that’s really…it’s a joyful day for me to go to work. It’s a joyful experience to get this on people and to do the magic that I get to do with them and share what I am so passionate about and to have them respond to it so positively.

CATHY: It’s been a very joyful experience…one of the most rewarding of my life, especially at this point in my career, so to be able to go to work and to bring to someone a sense of hope that their life can be different, and so that’s a pretty joyful experience right there, and so we’ve now taken the NewGait to some clinics and shared with other therapists while they have their own clientele there and to see the response from their own patients, to have a clinic of several therapists tearful and joyful. Literally, patients walk and blossom before your eyes. It’s almost for me a euphoric high. I mean I just can’t tell you how cool it is to be able to use something like this in a clinical setting and to have such a dramatic result in such a short amount of time. That’s just been a game-changer for me. It’s like putting on an erector set on someone and just manipulating a band here or trying a band there or working as a team with the other therapists and the patient’s input to just get the right combination to have that person move with ease and confidence, and it’s just been the most joyful thing.

“I just can’t tell you how cool it is to be able to use this in a clinical setting and have such a dramatic result in such a short amount of time. That’s just been a game-changer for me.”

KIM: I love how adaptable this is and how quick I can manipulate and change it. That is the absolute appeal of it to us clinicians is that you can be inspired and in a moment’s notice, you can react to your inspiration and change their world.

CATHY: The results are instantaneous. I mean, you put it on and they move three steps away from you and you can see the result of it. You don’t have to let them walk for five minutes or three days. You know instantly whether that band is right where you want it or not and if not, you just change it up and put it somewhere else and go with another option for the use of the device. But from…again, from a therapist’s perspective, from trying to really change walking, what tools have we had in the past. We’ve had Ace wraps and we’ve had some Thera-Band, but this…when you put this on as a therapist and you feel what this can do, you will be amazed…blown away…because then you’re going to know exactly like what patients…” Oh, I should have used this…I should call up so-and-so and have them come back. I’ve got this new tool. I bet I could manipulate that part of their gait pattern. It is just really fun, and sometimes therapists are a little intimidated by it, of course, because you want to do the right thing, but, you know, and sometimes we’re very analytical about it, like, “Well, I don’t know what muscle is not working. I need to put this right in the right places.” You know, sometimes I think I know what this person is going to need and I put it on and they go, “It’s not working for me,” so then I’ll go, “Okay. Let’s try this here. Let’s try this there,” and all of a sudden, boom…you get it, and so it is so easy to use. You can put the bands in any combinations and your client is going to give you immediate feedback on whether that was the way to go or not, and they, too, will offer suggestions like, “Well, what if we put a band here.” “Well, let’s try it,” and then, boom, off they go and they’re happy as a clam. So it has been, again, a really cool manipulative tool in the clinic that we’ve tried to use before, and there is research out there, even though this is a relatively new product and, boy, there is a lot more research I’d love to do, as with my partners, too, but there is research to support the use of Thera-Band in a gait-assisted pattern and this is, again, a Thera-Band type elastic band manipulation of movement, and so there are also different suits that have been designed over the years that we recently came across that also have support to show that this type of an idea is beneficial and this, again, this product is so easy to use, so affordable really for clients to purchase for home if they need it for long term. And the other things about chronic pain is people often say, “Well, but it’s chronic pain, you know…it’s not a neurological condition. It’s not an orthopedic condition.” Well, yeah, it is. My people often have orthopedic conditions. They’ve had knee replacements. They still have pain. They’ve had all sorts of surgeries on all sorts of body parts, fused ankles. They have had stroke. They’ve had failed back surgery. They’ve had MS. They’ve had all sorts of chronic and persistent pain from a multitude of neurological and orthopedic, and sometimes both, and this device has been able to help any and all of them, and so that’s what’s so cool about it.

Cathy graduated with her Master of Science Degree in Physical Therapy from Grand Valley State University in Michigan. After having worked in a variety of therapy settings for 20 years, Cathy discovered a passion for helping people with Chronic Pain. Cathy is using the NewGait daily with a variety of patient conditions after discovering how helpful the device can be.

Kathy Tooman and Jozie Weiler Discuss “Miraculous” Experiences with the NewGait

Kathy Tooman & Jozie Weiler Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Kathy Tooman, PT & Jozie Weiler, DPT discuss their “Miraculous” experiences with the NewGait. Moderated by Benga Adeeko and Cathy Ruprecht

Kathy Tooman & Jozie Weiler are licensed physical therapists at West Michigan Physical Therapy. Together they have more than 40 years of experience with diverse backgrounds and specializations, along with great energy and passion. Listen to their “Miraculous” experiences with the NewGait.

KATHY: I’m Kathy Tooman. I’m a graduate of the University of Michigan, and we both work in an outpatient private practice clinic in Ludington, Michigan. I’ve been working for over 30 years. And my specialization, is probably manual therapy and analysis emotion. I also work at the local gymnastic center. So that’s a real prime interest of mine.

JOZIE: I’m Jozie Weiler. I graduated from the University of Puget Sound in Washington State. I’ve been practicing with Kathy at this clinic for a year now in August. I’m a new graduate, so I guess I’m specialized in generalization. But I really enjoy working with athletes. I have a passion for oncology, so I want to play with that in the future too.

JOZIE: At first I was like, “Oh, I don’t know what this is, but, yeah we’ll try it. Why not, you know?” So they strapped me in and then I walked and Kathy was like, “Whoa, she’s walking way better!” I didn’t know I was walking wrong in the first place, but I actually felt like I had more rotation, more movement, and it felt easier and more free. I took it off and it kind of stayed with me for a little while and then eventually wore off. We played with it in the clinic too, demonstrating for our colleagues here about how to strap it in and all that stuff. I did a single leg lateral step down, and I’ve had knee pain for a long time now, and I actually could do that without pain. That was even more intriguing. This actually does something, I don’t know what yet, but we played with it and firsthand I experienced how it can help movement.

KATHY: I’ve had a chronic recurring hip pain since I was 29. I actually have instability in the left hip. No matter what I do, I cannot get it stronger, I cannot be pain free. We put the NewGait on me, and much to my surprise, I felt like I was loading in my left leg. I hadn’t been aware that I don’t walk with my left leg and it wasn’t connected. I had a sense of “whoa, I have two legs here.” The chronic pain that I had in my hip and SI joint went away after that little trial and it lasted for 10 days! We brought it home and had so much fun with it. We’re kind of thrilled that there’s not a lot of research. We’re kind of glad that we are the people helping to provide the data and coming up with the protocols. So we’re glad to be part of this. We first did the trial offer, I actually called a lot of patients that I thought it might help. And I just said, “We’ve got this new toy I want you to try.” Every single one of them, every single one of them, when I put it on them, felt dramatic change. One person I did videos before and after, and then they came back the next time, their gait pattern had changed 360. That was cool. And then one person I know is totally unstable. I don’t think she has any proprioception in any of her joints. She put it on and she literally started to cry. Because she said, “Now I feel my body,” and she didn’t want to take it off. And I think down the road, we’ll just order her one for home. She feels absolutely high in it. But the real best one, I’ve got two case studies on these two clients. Both of them I’ve known since they were in early elementary school, and now they are seniors in high school. Both of them had no functional neurological ability to push off their feet. One was a gymnast, so through the years, we’ve been able to retrain her to use her body but she can’t move her ankles. She had faulty range of motion and no ability to jump even when she was 10. The other gal was a runner, who I’ve also seen off and on since she was a young girl. And this kid had the most horrible posture. Her head was forward, back is rounded like this, no matter what we did we could not change it. Both of those girls, six months later now, are jumping as high as they’ve ever jumped in their life. They’ve had to retrain their whole loading and running techniques because they are so fast and they’re pushing off so high. Miraculous! For 30 days we tried all these people and had positive results on everybody. So we bought the NewGait and now we use it clinically.

“One person I know is totally unstable. I don’t think she has any proprioception in any of her joints. She put it on and she literally started to cry. Because she said, ‘Now I feel my body,’ and she didn’t want to take it off.

KATHY: We are trying to work on a theory for that. But all of us know that it is adding more proprioception and compression through the joints. Muscles move in functional patterns, they don’t move alone. We know that from earliest development, we have to have a core established before we can use our extremities. We also know if one part of the body is injured, the whole body gets screwed up. And the other thing we know, and have fought with as physical therapists, is that movement is not cognitive. You cannot think yourself to move. And although we’re all incredibly good therapists, find ourselves saying, “Shift your weight like this, do it like this.” And these intelligent athletes try to do it, they try to think how to change their running. As soon as they go out into their sports, they can’t do it. Now when you’re getting all of this compression, all this proprioceptive feedback into your joints, something else is happening too. I think maybe what’s happening is that we are giving an environment for the neuromuscular system to reboot itself internally. And we’re ending all that external cortical confusion. So the body has a chance to go, “Oh, yeah, I get this.” I think that might be what we see. It’s like the antidote for movement gone astray.

JOZIE: I thought about having a shoulder pain patient try it, and just see what happens. It’s not necessarily for shoulders, it’s more for lower extremity and posture. But you know what the heck, why not? So we tried it and this lady loved it, she’s like, “I feel taller. I don’t feel so warped.” She’s really enjoyed it she wants to keep using it and coming back.

“We tried it and this lady loved it, she’s like, ‘I feel taller. I don’t feel so warped.’ She’s really enjoyed it she wants to keep using it.”

KATHY: I have a friend who is six-foot-eight and he actually had what I thought was stroke like symptoms. He couldn’t get in to see a doctor so I virtually appointed him. I said, you know, there’s this thing called NewGait that we work with. Then he ordered the NewGait just for the leg that was weak, he retrained himself to walk just through me virtually seeing him in a matter of three weeks. And speaking again about athletes and their techniques, it’s mind blowing. Because once they’ve been hardwired into a certain technique, it’s hard to break through. But the NewGait does! Kind of like I said, “It reboots them and they can learn. They can learn whole new techniques.”

JOZIE: Our colleague had a young kid, he was like 15, and he had several knee dislocations. He ended up having a revision surgery to his entire system, and he was so afraid to walk. Stiff-legged, limping, he was terrified. Which, he should be, this was the third time he had dislocated his knee, and he finally got this massive surgery. The NewGait helped him not be fearful of movement. He’s still using it, and now he’s walking so much better. And we’ve also used it on a chronic stroke patient too. We see him walking around all the time, and it’s crazy.

“He was so afraid to walk. Stiff-legged, limping, he was terrified… The NewGait helped him not be fearful of movement. He’s still using it, and now he’s walking so much better.

KATHY: I really want to use it on gymnasts. That group as a population usually have no sense of where their joints are in space. You can spend hour after hour after hour trying to place your hands on them to show them how to feel it, but they don’t know what you mean. You have to keep doing it. And then you have to keep spotting. So it’s labor intensive and frustrating for the gymnast and the coaches and the parents. I was thinking we could set up NewGait on them so that we can get the flexed knees so they don’t hyperextend them and keep the thoracic spines back and their core in. So I’m very excited to try it. I think it’s a huge population to make a big difference.

CATHY: Well, we certainly appreciate your enthusiasm and your ability to use this as creatively as you have. I know it’s very exciting for the clients and it’s very exciting for you as staff and we really appreciate you sharing this.

KATHY & JOZIE: Thank you guys for developing it. It’s been really fun and we found a lot of usefulness out of it and our patients really do enjoy it.

Dr. Stephen Kanter, Director of Rehab Services at the IMSMP, has an ambitious vision for the NewGait.

Dr. Stephen Kanter has a vast resumé and is an avid NewGait Fitter at the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice where he is the Director of Rehab Services. In the interview, Dr. Kanter reflects on his "Dream" for the NewGait.

Chronic Pain Talk - Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Dr. Kanter discusses his “Dream” for the NewGait. Moderated by Benga Adeeko and Cathy Ruprecht.

BENGA: Thank you everyone for joining. Today We have Cathy Ruprecht, one of our NewGait clinicians, as well as Dr. Stephen Kanter. Dr. Stephen Kanter is a licensed physical therapist and athletic trainer in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Kanter works primarily with patients with balance, gait, and endurance impairments. He earned his Master's of Science and doctorate in physical therapy at Rutgers University. He is the Director of Rehabilitation Services at the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice in New York City. He is a nationally recognized expert in rehabilitation for people with MS and has worked to develop the AthCare MS Rehabilitation Professionals Network to promote education and clinical collaboration to improve the care provided to people with MS and their families. In 2015, Dr. Kanter was inducted into the National MS Society Healthcare Professionals Volunteer Hall of Fame. Dr. Kanter is a professor at Seton Hall University where he teaches Biomedical Ethics, Human Anatomy and Sports Pharmacology. Thank you Dr. Kanter, That's quite a resume you've got, thank you for joining us.

DR. KANTER: The short answer is that my father had multiple sclerosis. Neuro rehabilitation was not something that I thought I had enough skills to do. When I came out of physical therapy school, I had a stronger sense and background in sports health care, and became a certified athletic trainer working in professional sports. I really worked that route. After working in professional sports, and thinking about where I wanted my career to go, I had a couple of opportunities in home care in New York City. In that home care experience, I started to work with many people with neuro based disorders, including multiple sclerosis. During that time, developed the skill set that I did not feel like I originally had. In 2008, I interviewed for the job at the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice to take over the leadership of the department and develop it to what it is now. Cathy, your patient population was primarily neuro? Geriatric? Both?

CATHY: Primarily folks with chronic pain. A lot of them have gait abnormalities, but we work on some confidence engagement, and we work on changing up some parameters of gait and the most amazing thing is that they’ll tell me, “My pain is gone.”

DR. KANTER: Why do you think that is?

CATHY: Well, if you know anybody that wants to do research, I would like to know why that is. I have some ideas, based on my pain-neuroscience background, in that there’s something about the device that creates a postural realignment, it depresses the scapula. I think it helps to change the breathing from that secondary musculature. I think it helps to create some step with confidence. A lot of people walk with a very narrow gait pattern and they seem unbalanced, with a very lateral trunk sway. A lot of times my people with chronic and persistent pain have had some sort of unresolved orthopedic or neurological issue. So someone that has no plantar flexion, you know, never has any sort of toe off. You’ve got to bring that leg through somehow and swing but there’s something about getting that assistance and suddenly, the nervous system says, “Well, hey, thanks for figuring that out.” Now, I don’t have to use, my quadratus, or my back extensors, or whatever compensatory movement pattern I was trying to do to achieve that movement. They find pain relief with that. It’s just been amazing.

DR. KANTER: That this is a key tool that you’re using is very insightful. We’ll definitely take that into consideration in our program. We are about to open up a big Wellness Center which will incorporate, not just the NewGait, but a lot of state of the art products that can help people with MS walk better and improve their balance. I’ve been on the road to improving the lives of people with multiple sclerosis, and bounce dysfunction ever since.

DR. KANTER: When I started working with people with multiple sclerosis, I started to identify a series of common mobility limitations. Foot drop is a very common one that most physical therapist’s and movement professionals are aware of. Neuro physical therapist’s have a little bit more insight to work with orthotist to manage foot drop, but using an AFO, I quickly found was not very useful. In thinking out of the box, we start to work with different products on the market. During that time, foot drop wasn’t always the primary issue that patients needed to manage because it could be managed through an orthotic or a brace, but the hip drop or the hip weakness really became an element of impairment that we couldn’t really solve. Strengthening it couldn’t help it, and the hip flexion assist orthosis was a product that was developed, as well as a couple other products that became potentially useful for hip flexion weakness and hip drop. None of them really worked as well as I would have wanted it to, or there was a price limitation so patients weren’t willing to try it outside of my clinic. My goal is always to provide something to a patient in the clinic that they can take home and use in their home program and in their day to day life if possible. A patient introduced me to the NewGait. When I saw the NewGait, it clicked right away that it would make sense for people for walking. Also the other major impairment, which is actually stairs or curbs, and ever since then, I’ve been using it with patients on a regular basis.

“When I saw the NewGait, it clicked right away that it would make sense for people for walking… Ever since then, I’ve been using it with patients on a regular basis.”

DR. KANTER: Once they get into NewGait and realize that their hip is engaging better through the energy that’s created by the device and realize that they’re able to move better. And then the conversation gets into where we go from there in regard to balance and gait training, and create some prognosis, which is within reason.

Dr. KANTER: We have a couple of patients who are on the road to getting it. I would be surprised if they didn’t. Previously, I think I’ve had three people who either purchased it or expressed interest in purchasing it. Of those three patients, I know at least two of them have used it beyond just myself. Either in other facilities somewhere, or they have it on their own.

DR. KANTER: I’ve probably tried it on approximately 30 patients in the past year. The big holdup is obviously the past several months of having fewer patients because the clinical services sort of went down. When we started speaking, I went back and looked, and seemed to be about 30 patients myself, my colleague, tried in on five to eight patients. And then our occupational therapist has started to look into how she would integrate it into certain balance and standing activities for her ADL training.

DR. KANTER: I could definitely feel the forces that are being created, which is what my mind focuses on. How to create potential energy from end stance, to toe-off, to initial swing, even if there’s a compensation. I’m not worried as much about the compensation if they can clear the foot, but to see that this can be more efficient, and obviously create a change in how the patient feels with that swing phase, which is really a limiting factor with gait, as you know.

DR. KANTER: The most rewarding were a couple of patients that I trialed it with. They took a step up on a curb in a simulation, that they hadn’t been able to do in a very long time. It was much easier and they got a sense that they can do it without overly compensating, without overly circumducting, and without using their hands. The next step with it, at the MS clinic, is to work on a whole staircase with patients and to be a little more aggressive in their stair training. For patients who need to negotiate that in their house or work, this is the modality of choice for me. When you consider neuroplastic changes, there is a bunch of evidence out there, where, if you’re going to have a muscle do something, it needs to do it in the specific way you want it to. Unfortunately, too many patients are doing sitting exercises, or laying on their back. They say, “I work on this muscle all the time, and I feel stronger, but why cant I do it standing.” When they work with the NewGait, they’re getting the benefit of more reps, rather than harder reps. Patients with MS, many times, are willing to work hard, but they obviously want to see results. You don’t need to fatigue out by over-exerting, when it’s unnecessary. With the NewGait, providing what is equivalent to an active assist at times, will, to me, create more contraction of the hip flexors, and obviously other muscles as well. But the hip flexors I focus on because it really is one of those areas of rehab in MS that we’ve had a lot of difficulty with.

“They took a step up on a curb in a simulation, that they hadn’t been able to do in a very long time. It was much easier and they got a sense that they can do it without overly compensating, without overly circumducting, and without using their hands.”

DR. KANTER: If they see me, they can use it each week or every other week. We’ve had a couple of patients who have done that. The majority right now, come and use it for their first trial, maybe come for a second trial, with the intention that they’ll get it on their own and integrate it into their home program. Or they will find a local PT who either will get it, or has it, or something similar. My dream is that many PT’s out there, would have the NewGait, so that we can do the trial and then say, “Go to a therapist who can utilize the NewGait to perform their exercises with.” Ultimately, I do believe getting it for a home based program is really what would make the biggest difference. It’s not an expensive product in the big picture of rehabilitation modalities. Like I have said, there are other hip flexion products out there, some are reasonably priced, and some are not. The NewGait has variability that the others actually don’t. Technological based FPS products for people with MS to help them walk are thousands of dollars. A neural based approach would be to incorporate this device and supplement it with a musculoskeletal and strengthening program. But if they only do the strengthening program, and don’t do the neural based program, then they miss out. I hope if anything that patients therapists gain from this conversation, is to get a neuro based closed-chain, standing program, and if they have hip flexion weakness, then incorporate this device. My role at the IMSMP is to try to gain a network of therapists who are willing to accept referrals for patients with MS. After I see them and develop a plan of care, I’m looking to pass them on because I can’t see them locally. The network was created for people who are in wellness and rehab, medicine, nursing, or social work, who want to get referrals from myself and our practice, to work collaboratively. I’m still looking for any physical therapists, occupational therapists, and wellness professionals who are looking for people to get referrals from people with MS. Let me know and we’ll speak and hopefully get you on the network list. They can contact me directly, email is probably easiest at skanter2@imsmp.org. If you go to the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice site, you’ll be able to call the number there. We’ve had good stuff so I’m looking forward to getting the word out there.

“My dream is that many PT’s out there, would have the NewGait… Ultimately, I believe getting it for a home based program is really what would make the biggest difference. It’s not an expensive product in the big picture of rehabilitation modalities.”

Dr. Stephen Kanter has a vast resumé and is an avid NewGait Fitter at the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice where he is the Director of Rehab Services. In the interview, Dr. Kanter reflects on his “Dream” for the NewGait.

Phuong Vu, PT at the Rehab Institute of Michigan (RIM), tells us about her, “Positive results,” with the NewGait.

Phuong Vu was an early believer in the NewGait. She has been using the NewGait at the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan for more than two years, ever since a patient introduced it to her. We had a great conversation with Phuong about her experience using the NewGait.

Phuong Vu Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Phuong Vu discusses her experience with the NewGait.

NewGait CEO, Benga Adeeko, had the opportunity to ask Cathy Ruprecht, PT, NewGait Clinician, and pain specialist, a number of questions regarding the treatment of chronic pain, and how The NewGait has changed the way she practices. Also features Kim Spranger, PT and NewGait Clinician

PHUONG: I actually heard about the NewGait through a client of mine. He had an incomplete spinal cord injury and was researching different modalities and treatment techniques for spinal cord injury. He came across the NewGait and asked me to look into it.

PHUONG: I think we have been using it for about two years or so now. We use it with both our inpatient and outpatient clients and really anybody with a neurological disorder, but primarily spinal cord injury and stroke patients. We have had a lot of positive results from the NewGait, usually improved strength. We’ve had a couple clients get some motor return.

“We have had a lot of positive results from the NewGait, usually improved strength. We’ve had a couple clients get some motor return.”

PHUONG: A couple of our patients have purchased the NewGait and use it as a home exercise program, which I think has definitely helped speed up recovery. Two particular patients that have purchased it are ambulating better, their steps are smoother, they’re actually able to clear their toes when they are walking, and it just makes everything more safe at home.

“Patients that have purchased it are ambulating better, their steps are smoother, they’re actually able to clear their toes when they are walking, and it just makes everything more safe at home.”

PHUONG: I know it looks intimidating with all of the pieces that come with it, but that’s the best part, you can customize it to your patient. It really doesn’t take long to set up, if that is a concern. Once you start using it, it is a fairly easy process and it only takes a few minutes.

PHUONG: With the cost, it is inexpensive compared to some of the other products out on the market. This one allows patients to purchase it for home use to get the carry over. I think that’s been one of the positives that I’ve seen from NewGait, that the cost is pretty inexpensive.

Terry Tripp, Physical Therapist and Co-Owner of UP Rehab Services (Marquette, MI) tells us how the NewGait has made an impact in his clinicis.

Russ and Terry Tripp were some of the earliest NewGait adopters during its transition from sports performance to healthcare. They believed in the NewGait from the beginning, and now have a NewGait in every one of their outpatient clinics!

I had the benefit of working with Benga and Jordan during the inception of the NewGait. From the beginning, I was intrigued by the product. One of our therapists, Kim Spranger, had the epiphany of taking the SpeedMaker, and using it to change gait. The result with the first client was incredible. The client sustained a spinal cord injury and had surgery to stabilize her spine and decompress her nerves. The client had to use 2 canes to walk before she used the NewGait. After her treatment with the NewGait, she could run while wearing it. This prompted a study at NMU. This study found that when clients who have MS wear the NewGait, their gait speed improved statistically which of course made the client more energy efficient which is a life changing effect.

“One of our therapists, Kim Spranger, had the epiphany of taking the SpeedMaker, and using it to change gait. The result with the first client was incredible.”

Being a PT who owns his own business, I was very excited to support my team of therapists who wanted to use the NewGait. It has been very successful with multiple client types in our practice. One of our physical therapists, Cathy Ruprecht, has been using the NewGait on clients who suffer from chronic pain and is seeing remarkable results. I have seen the improvements first hand with my father-in-law, who was treated by Cathy for chronic low back pain. He can now walk with improved cadence and duration with much less pain and has improved his quality of life.

“I have seen the improvements first hand with my father-in-law, who was treated by Cathy for chronic low back pain. He can now walk with improved cadence and duration with much less pain and has improved his quality of life.”

I know that it works, I see it every day in our practice. I believe in this product and we currently have a NewGait in every one of our outpatient clinics. I have no financial interest in this product. I support this product because I see the results firsthand that it works! I strongly endorse this product to be utilized by all therapists who want to improve their client’s quality of life, improve their client’s functional mobility and lessen their client’s pain.

“I believe in this product and we currently have a NewGait in every one of our outpatient clinics. I have no financial interest in this product. I support this product because I see the results firsthand that it works!”

Kim Spranger tells us her story of discovering the NewGait

Kim Spranger Discovers the NewGait

Watch the video version here. Kim Spranger tells us her story as the first therapist to ever use the NewGait.

BENGA: Thank you everyone for joining. Today we had the opportunity to speak with Kim Spranger, one of our founding NewGait clinicians, and discoverer of the NewGait as a rehab device. Kim is a physical therapist in the UP of Michigan and today she is going to tell us her story as the first person to use the NewGait.

Kim Spranger was the first therapist to ever use the NewGait. Today, she is the Director of Culture at NewGait. Listen to her story about discovering the device and her experience using it for Spinal Cord Injury Rehab.

KIM: My name is Kim Spranger, and I’m a physical therapist. I’m a lymphedema specialist, so I have treated lymphedema patients for years, but otherwise, I have been working in outpatient orthopedics for about 14 years now.

KIM: It actually wasn’t a NewGait, when I saw the device, and I saw it, on Facebook, actually. My son pointed it out to me, as a unique training device for runners. Immediately I saw the potential application to physical therapy, so I obtained one and started to use it.

KIM: Well, if I think about the day I just had it in the clinic, I probably used it on 60-70% of the patients that I saw today. I use it for diagnosing, like, what really is problem with their gait? If I try it on them in a certain way does that change their gait? Which helps me know what muscles to train with them. So I use it in a diagnostic sort of way. I use it for biofeedback when I’m trying to teach them something about how they’re moving, but they’re not really hearing me, or they can’t take what I’m saying and then change what they’re doing. It’s great for manual cueing to make that happen. Sometimes people just need some postural stability or feedback, I’ve used it that way as well. Sometimes people are coming in with a neurological condition and they just have so much fatigue or heaviness to their limbs that the NewGait is just a fabulous way to kind of de-weight them. One of the fellows said today, “Wow, it’s just picking up my leg for me.” So I’m using it in all of those different ways throughout my day.

“I probably used it on 60-70% of the patients that I saw today… It’s great for manual cueing… Sometimes people just need some postural stability or feedback.”

KIM: Well, once someone said to me that, as therapists, we are like carpenters, and we have tools in our tool belt. The more tools we have, then the more effectively we can do our job. So the NewGait has become, a special tool in my tool belt. Throughout my day, it’s not like, “oh, this is a certain diagnosis, so I should use the NewGait.” That is not how it works, it’s more like, this is what I see, or don’t see, in how they’re moving, that I now have a whole new set of tools to give them the feedback, and help them reach their goals.

I feel like the staff that works here are always looking for new and different approaches to what we do. And we talk about it frequently. The thing about this device is, it’s not like, you know, “here’s the directions, and you put it on this way and you always use it the same way.” It’s not like that at all. We’ll be playing around with it, and be like, “Hey, you know, look at this new thing I just did. Oh my gosh, that is so cool.” I heard Megan saying that today about someone, and I will think, “Wow, I should try that on patient X tomorrow, because I see the same thing with him that you’re seeing with this patient.” So it gives us reasons to collaborate and try new things together. Patients will pick up on that energy too. They want to be looked at as individuals and not just doing the same exercises everyday, but instead really modifying things to make their therapy the most effective, and the NewGait has done that for us.

“It gives us reasons to collaborate and try new things. Patients pick up on that energy too. They want to be looked at as individuals and not just doing the same exercises everyday, but instead modifying things to make their therapy the most effective, the NewGait has done that for us.”

KIM: Well, I believe that this group of people has been, literally hand picked for this moment and for this product. We did not go searching for them. They just came into our lives. And yet, we are all very much equally have the same kind of passion for life. We are the kind of people who just really want to make a difference. We’re a team who cares in a way that is unique for this day that we live in. As we’ve all worked together over the last three years or so, it’s been truly an experience for all of us. We don’t do this because we have to, we do this because we want to. There is something within me that is really fulfilled by working on this project and watching what it can do.

“We’re a team who cares in a way that is unique for this day that we live in.”

KIM: Well, that’s easy for me because when I first got it, I had never seen it before so it was like, you know, trying a new bike for the first time. No one had ever used it for therapy before. I had this patient that I really loved and really was rooting for, I had a special connection with her. And to be able to take this thing that was unheard of, put it on her, and go from walking with two canes, to walking without a cane and looking so much more confident, almost immediately, that’s kind of a highlight day for therapists. I would say the second one is when we took it down to a spinal cord Institute in Detroit to see these young men who are so hopeful of regaining function and mobility. We were able to put the NewGait on them and have them be wowed, over and over agin. I love it when people say, “Wow!” I walked out of that building and said, “This has been a very good day.”

“to be able to take this thing that was unheard of, put it on her, and go from walking with two canes, to walking without a cane and looking so much more confident, almost immediately.”

KIM: This device will become like several other devices that I’ve seen over my years in therapy where, initially, it looks novel, and people go, “Hmm, I wonder what that does.” I see that people are going to start to understand what it can do for their clinic and how cost effective it is. I think it will become as common as any other popular rehab tool.

Alyssa Portelli tells us about improvements using the NewGait on neuro patients

Alyssa Portelli Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Alyssa Portelli, physical therapist at the University of Michigan, discuss the improvements she has seen using the NewGait on neuro patients

ALYSSA: I’m Alyssa Portelli. I’m a physical therapist at the University of Michigan and I primarily work with a neurological population.

ALYSSA: So, with the neurological population, we’ve done a lot of postural corrections, core stability, we have used it a lot with the ataxia patients, and then a lot of gait training. All of our patients really like it. Even family members have noted, “Oh, they’re walking so much better, they can clear their foot now!”

Even family members have noted, “Oh, they’re walking so much better, they can clear their foot now!”

KIM: I would like to add to that, you know, Cathy’s journey with chronic pain has been very interesting. In the 1990s we were asked to get involved with developing a chronic pain program for our region. Cathy took it to a totally different level and actually in the last couple of years, she has developed a long-term philosophy on how to treat chronic pain that all of us have now adopted and are using in our clinics. I think of a patient this fall who came back and she said, “This has changed my life. I want you to know how much you’ve changed my life by the way that you’ve approached my pain.” So I want to give a whole lot of credibility to what Cathy is saying and she has changed the way we are treating chronic pain across the upper peninsula of Michigan.

“She has changed they way we are treating chronic pain across the upper peninsula of Michigan.”

ALYSSA: Yeah, a lot of our patients come in with a brace or AFO, and they like using the NewGait a lot better. They feel like the muscles are working in the NewGait, opposed to just the brace holding them there. So, in terms of outcome measures, we’ve seen improvements in gait speed, functional lower extremity strength, and even overall endurance, which is really cool to see!

“We’ve seen improvements in gait speed, functional lower extremity strength, and even overall endurance.”

ALYSSA: I would say that it’s a great piece of equipment, it’s a good adjunct to anything you’re doing. Once you get the hang of it, it’s super easy to put on and you can do your whole treatment or anything you had planned before, but with the NewGait on. It helps give that patient a little bit more of those normal patterns, the postural correction to train, I think it’s great. I think everyone should get one, all of our patients really liked it and we’ve had really good success with it.

“I think it’s great. I think everyone should get one, all of our patients really liked it and we’ve had really good success with it.”

Alyssa Portelli is a physical therapist at the University of Michigan. She is specialized in neurologic rehabilitation and immediately believed the NewGait would make a difference in her practice. We had a chance to check in with Alyssa to see how things were going.

Using the NewGait as a prosthetist and orthotic fitter

Lynn Vanwelsenaers is a certified prosthetist and orthotic fitter in the UP of Michigan. She is one of NewGait's founding clinicians. Today, she is the Director of Product Innovation. Listen to her story about becoming involved back when the NewGait was first being discovered as a rehab tool.

Lynn Vanwelsenaers Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Certified prosthetist and orthotic fitter, Lynn Vanwelsenaers, discusses learning about the NewGait and how it has changed her practice.

LYNN: My name is Lynn Vanwelsenaers and I am a certified prosthetist and orthotic fitter.

LYNN: I was introduced to the NewGait by Kim Spranger, who happened to stop by my office one day, and asked me if I’d be interested in learning about it. I said, “Certainly.” And then Jordan came to visit me and I actually tried it on that day and ran around in it. I immediately saw that it would make a difference for people with gait imbalances. It’s added a dimension that I didn’t have before. And it actually helps patients have more success earlier on.

LYNN: In my daily practice, I actually use it on new amputee’s who have different gait deviations to help them know how to fire their muscles for gait patterns. I will sometimes use it to see what they’re lacking and what they might need in general. Since I’ve been working with it, I’ve learned to use it to address many muscle imbalance or postural conditions.

“I’ve learned to use it to address many muscle imbalance or postural conditions.”

LYNN: In general, my favorite moment with the NewGait is the smile that it brings to people’s faces when they realize that this actually might work! It looks weird, it makes the patients feel like a puppet sometimes. But when they actually feel what they feel when they’re using it, it spreads a smile across their face and light in their eyes and the hope is restored. That is my favorite moment.

“It spreads a smile across their face and light in their eyes and the hope is restored.”

LYNN: Our team is set apart from others because we actually work really well together. We put first things first. We are grateful. And it’s just a joy to work with everybody who is passionate and focused and excited about what we’re doing.

LYNN: I believe that the NewGait is going to change rehab as we know it today. I think it’s going to add a dimension. It’s going to help people actually restore parts of their lives that they haven’t had, and it’s going to allow people to get back to more functional living.

“The NewGait is going to change rehab as we know it today.”

Kate Rose reflects on her experiences with The NewGait and how it has improved her treatment plans

Physical Therapist, Kate Rose, reflects on her experiences with The NewGait and how it has improved her treatment plans. Not only does she use it on her patients, but has additional experience using the NewGait herself for chronic pain. Listen to her educational story.

Kate Rose Video Interview

Watch the video version here. Physical therapist, Kate Rose, reflects on her experiences with the NewGait and how it has improved her treatment plans.

KATE: My name is Kate Rose. And I’m a physical therapist in Marquette, Michigan, and I work in an outpatient clinic.

KATE: I’ve been a physical therapist for over 30 years. I did a fellowship with Gary Gray, who is a movement scientist, one of the leaders in the nation in movement science, and he’s a physical therapist to professional athletes and just an amazing man. His philosophy is called applied functional science. And it’s based on the science of movement. And so, I’m going to say that’s my specialty. It’s called AFS. It’s just looking at the body as a whole. Because when your foot hits the ground, everything, there is a chain reaction in every joint in your body. And so, we don’t want to isolate one joint and look at that, we want to look at the whole body always, which fits in really well with the NewGait!

“We don’t want to isolate one joint and look at that, we want to look at the whole body always, which fits in really well with the NewGait!”

KATE: I got introduced by Kim Spranger, who we both know is an incredibly enthusiastic person. And the minute she saw the NewGait, she couldn’t believe what the potential was in physical therapy. She told me about it and at the time, I was working in home health. So, she came and did an in-service at our clinic and left us with a unit. And we were able to play around with it in home health. But then I went back to outpatient, and I started working with Kim closely, and she showed me so many things, with so many patients.

KATE: I use it a lot with the older folks that come in with all kinds of weaknesses. I’ve used it with our athletes, we work with a high school that’s right across the street from our clinic. And also our knee replacement patients I have used it a lot with them.

KATE: After using it for a while, it became less intimidating, you know? I just knew what to do. In the beginning, I wasn’t sure what to do. And I’ll tell you what else really helped, is having those extra D-Anchors, now we just have a bunch of those on every piece. So, once it’s on somebody and you decide to add something else, you just have to get a bungee and hook it up. But it was just using it. Like anything, the more you use it, it just becomes familiar and a heck of a lot easier. You could start more simply. And I think that would be a great way to introduce people to using it is to not feel like you have to use every single piece. The first time just put the leg piece or something.

“Like anything, the more you use it, it just becomes familiar and a heck of a lot easier.”

KATE: As time went on, I just started seeing more and more potential for it and using it on a lot more people. Initially, you say, “I’m going to use this on my stroke patient or my neuro patient because it’s such an obvious need.” But then if they look at the potential of it, you go, “Well, wait a minute, what about this person who just has a bunch of postural issues that you cannot seem to chew away.” So I think you’re right, it’s exactly that you see the potential more as it gets user friendly for you. And even the potential as a strengthening tool. Not just a replacement for a weak muscle, but to strengthen a muscle. 

“It’s exactly that you see the potential more as it gets user friendly for you. And even the potential as a strengthening tool. Not just a replacement for a weak muscle.”

KATE: I had a herniated disk, I had weakness in my leg. I got the NewGait out and I put it on and I put it where the scientists told me I was weak. I put it on my hip abductors. And I put it on my foot dorsiflexors, and I walked. Initially, I had a lot on the hip. And did that ever work my hip. I saw how you could strengthen the opposing muscles. So, then I took it off the hip and just used it on my ankle. And then I could do that walk without any trouble. One day, I walked nine miles with that on. I used it for three weeks and every time I just got progressively stronger. So how much of that is actually the NewGait, plus healing? Who really knows? But after about three weeks, which is this week, I think I’m ready to take a walk without it. I haven’t taken a walk without it. I probably walked every other day. And three to five miles except that one nine-mile day.

“I saw how you could strengthen the opposing muscles. So, then I took it off the hip and just used it on my ankle. And then I could do that walk without any trouble.”

KATE: I just think that as we look at healthcare today, we have less and less visits. The more we can promote healing and creative ways with less visits, the better. The more effective we will be and the happier our patients will be.

KNEE PAIN

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Stem cells are the basic cellular building blocks of the bodies tissues and vital organs. They are found in all the body’s organs, tissues, blood, immune system and nervous tissue.

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The goal of both Regenerative and Anti-Aging Medicine is to optimize both longevity and to enhance the quality of life.

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Mr. Alejandro Schultz has been relieved of pain after 8 months of herniated disc herniation and shared this experience with you
Mr. Alejandro Schultz
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