Agnosia: Causes, Types, and Outlook

Agnosia

Agnosia is a condition that develops when particular neural pathways in the brain become damaged. These pathways are connected to regions that process sensory information. These regions of the brain are responsible for storing information and knowledge pertaining to the perception and classification of objects.

 

Lesions that occur in the parietal, temporal, or occipital lobes of the brain are the most common causes of agnosia. These lobes are responsible for the storage of semantic information as well as language. Lesions can be brought on by things like strokes, brain trauma, or encephalitis.

Types of agnosia

Visual agnosia

When there is damage to the brain along the circuits that connect the occipital lobe of the brain with the parietal or temporal lobe, a person may suffer from visual agnosia.

 

The occipital lobe is responsible for the compilation of all incoming visual information. You are able to comprehend the significance of this data because of the parietal and temporal lobes of your brain.

Agnosia

Apperceptive visual agnosia

When someone has apperceptive visual agnosia, it makes it difficult for them to recognize the shapes or forms of objects that they see. Because of this condition, it’s possible that you’ll have trouble telling one thing from another when you make a visual comparison of two different things.

 

It’s possible that you won’t be able to replicate a thing or create a picture of it. You might instead try to replicate a picture of a circle but instead wind up sketching a sequence of scribbles that are arranged in a circle.

Associative visual agnosia

The inability to recall information that is connected to an object is the hallmark of a condition known as associative visual agnosia. This entails being familiar with the object’s name as well as its function.

 

Even if you have this sort of agnosia, you are still able to create a picture of whatever it is that you don’t know.

 

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